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Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar

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After visiting the cliffs of Ásbyrgi, we hopped in the car and drove a few minutes south to the Vesturdalur campsite and the start of an extraordinary five-kilometer trail which would bring us through the Hljóðaklettar (Echo Rocks) to the foot of the Rauðhólar (Red Hills).

Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar

The Hljóðaklettar rocks are a wild array of basaltic columns, twisted and angled in every conceivable direction. The bizarre bending of the rocks results in caves, towers and other unclassifiable geometrical shapes. It’s like being on another world, and the area has an alien and almost menacing sort of beauty. Formed when the powerful Jökulsá River washed away chunks of volcanic craters, the rocks at Hljóðaklettar have strange acoustical properties which reflect, enhance or mute the river’s roar, depending on where you’re standing. Hence the name “Echo Rocks”.

After leaving Hljóðaklettar behind us, we approached the Rauðhólar (Red Hills), volcanic cinder cones made of pure red scoria. Capped with white snow, the hills add a shocking splash of color to the otherwise black and gray landscape of lava, mountain and river. You’re no longer allowed to ascend the Rauðhólar, as over-hiking had started to degrade their quality, but that’s not a big deal. They actually look better from a distance.

Location of Vesturdalur on our Map

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Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
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Hljóðaklettar and Rauðhólar
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October 22, 2013 at 2:33 pm Comments (3)

An Aerial Tour of Iceland

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You Might Also Like Our Flight Over The Westfjords

As amazing as it was to stand on the cliffs of Þingvellir and survey the rift valley where two tectonic plates are separating, it was even more amazing to fly over that same valley. I think I know why so many birds spend their summers in Iceland. The views are hard to beat.

Iceland Travel Blog

Aerial tours of Iceland are a booming business, and it’s not hard to understand why. Most of the country is inaccessible by car. Only a handful of roads crisscross the ungovernable interior and even these can only be traversed with 4-wheel drive jeeps. And even then, they’re dangerous, requiring river fording, and are completely off-limits during the winter. There are a lot of spots in Iceland which you have to see from the air, if you want to see them at all.

Our first aerial tour brought us from Reykjavík to the Langjökull Glacier, over Gullfoss, then around by Geysir and Þingvellir, and onto Hekla and Eyjafjallajökull. The country’s astounding geological diversity is truly evident from the air; we passed over fertile valleys, icy glacial expanses, still-smoking volcanoes, and steaming fields of geothermal activity, all within minutes.

This was my first time in a small propeller jet, but I was soon at ease. The flight was smooth and I was too engrossed staring out the window to remember my fears. The plane was a Cessna, a four-seater, and we were allowed to open the windows to get some spectacular shots from above. An unforgettable experience.

If you’d like to take a similar tour, get in touch with us. We have an excellent contact, who will be able to arrange a personalized tour from Reykjavík.

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August 15, 2013 at 8:04 pm Comments (15)

Hiking around the Western Snæfellsness, Part 1

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We set out early from Hellissandur for a big day of hiking around the western end of the Snæfellsnes Peninsula. This was our first extended hike in Iceland, and we had planned a promising route through lava fields, to the rims of craters, past waterfalls and across glacial rivers. Well, “crossing glacial rivers” wasn’t actually on the itinerary; it was more like a last-minute surprise at the day’s end.

Saxhóll Volcano Vulkan Iceland
Saxhóll Crater

We had stayed the night at the Hotel Hellissandur, which was large and comfortable, with a helpful staff happy to provide tips on our upcoming hike. We gorged ourselves on the hotel’s excellent breakfast buffet before setting out, providing us extra energy that turned out to be vital. Our hike was a lot longer and more difficult than we expected.

But the path started easy, following the coast southwest of Hellissandur past the remains of Viking-era fishing huts and to the Írskrabrunnur (Irish Well), a dried-up underground cistern guarded by a massive whale bone. Very cool. You can descend the stairs into the well, though there isn’t much reason unless you’re an aficionado of puddles and dirt walls.

Next we crossed the Neshraun Lava Field on our way to the Saxhóll Crater. Marked by red-tipped stakes, the trail was easy to follow, though not so easy to traverse. The dried lava was craggy and sharp, keeping our pace slow and clumsy until we reached the foot of the crater. Saxhóll erupted around 3000 years ago, forming the amazing landscape we’d just crossed. The climb to the crater’s rim was surprisingly easy, and the view down into the bowl was spectacular.

Saxhóll was just the first crater we saw on our long day out. As our journey continued, we would come ever nearer the Snæfellsjökull Glacier, and encounter waterfalls, snow, sheep, and absolutely no other people. Oh, and we would run into some rivers. Plenty of rivers.

Locations on our map: Hellissandur | Írskrabrunnur | Saxhóll
Check out the Hiking Map of the Area

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August 8, 2013 at 4:49 pm Comments (2)
Hljaklettar and Rauhlar After visiting the cliffs of Ásbyrgi, we hopped in the car and drove a few minutes south to the Vesturdalur campsite and the start of an extraordinary five-kilometer trail which would bring us through the Hljóðaklettar (Echo Rocks) to the foot of the Rauðhólar (Red Hills).
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