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Reykjavík Street Art

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Street Art Reykjavik

One of our favorite parts of moving to a new place is checking out the street art scene. We’ve come to learn that aspects of a city’s personality will often be reflected in its graffiti and public art, so the work we saw in Reykjavík wasn’t a total surprise. Extremely artistic, modern, intelligent and well-coordinated, Reykjavík’s street art is clearly done with the property owner’s permission. Perhaps a bit too nice for such an anarchic art form, but very Icelandic.

Framed Iceland Photos

Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
Street Art Reykjavik
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November 1, 2013 at 8:46 pm Comments (2)

Modern Art at the Hafnarhus

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With three venues spread across the city, each dedicated to a different discipline, the Listasafn Reykjavíkur is the largest art museum in Iceland. One ticket will get you into all three locations. We chose to start at the Hafnarhus (Harbor House), which focuses on modern Icelandic art.

Hafnarhus Reykjavik

Iceland is an isolated island in the middle of the North Atlantic which gets about thirteen seconds of sun during the winter. Unbroken darkness tends to make people a little eccentric, which perhaps explains why Icelanders have embraced the absurd in everything from fashion to politics to music. So it wasn’t exactly a surprise to discover that their modern art sits squarely in the realm of the surreal.

Even so, an exhibition which must be smelled? A video of people wearing hats pierced by long sticks, humming and muttering jibberish while a woman recites a poem in the background? A sound exhibition in the elevator which (according to its description) “produces a series of palimpsestic overlaps defined more by slips and discrepancies than by conjunctions”?

Most of the museum is dedicated to such weirdo temporary exhibits, but there’s a permanent collection featuring the work of Erró, Iceland’s most renowned postmodern artist. Erró concentrates in pop art, with heavy influences (and a lot of straight-up swiping) from the world of comics and Picasso. His pieces are strange, often political, occasionally perverted, and a lot of fun.

Location of the Hafnarhusid
Listasafn Reykjavíkur: Hafnarhusid – Website

Iceland Framed Photos

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Weird Stuff
Erró Iceland
Erró Art
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Erró Guernica
Erró Cubes
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August 24, 2013 at 10:21 am Comments (0)
Reykjavk Street Art One of our favorite parts of moving to a new place is checking out the street art scene. We've come to learn that aspects of a city's personality will often be reflected in its graffiti and public art, so the work we saw in Reykjavík wasn't a total surprise. Extremely artistic, modern, intelligent and well-coordinated, Reykjavík's street art is clearly done with the property owner's permission. Perhaps a bit too nice for such an anarchic art form, but very Icelandic.
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